September292014

I had a dream last week in which some of my language professors spoke a few lines of French. Not exactly a second language dream but it’s something, right?

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10AM

brimerica:

French memes are all the same.

(via parisienneballerina)

haha humor 

9AM

language-obsession:

I always run into problems with foreign words in English text. Do I read them properly and risk sounding pretentious, or do I read them in an Anglicized way?

(via whosaprettypolyglot)

truth 

September282014

Anonymous said: would you say "ne que" is used a lot more than "seulement" in colloquial terms?

awesomefrench:

Defo. 

French 

10AM

jaimetalangue:

COLOUR VOCAB CONTRIBUTIONS MASTERPOST - part III

I wanted to thank everyone who contributed to this, reblogging my first colour vocab masterpost and adding other languages to it!! Part I and II already posted, here’s the last part :)

> Colour vocab MASTERPOST |el, es, ru, it, fr, de, hu|

> Colour vocab CONTRIBUTIONS 1 |is, nl, lv, pt, ro, pl, sl, cs, ber|

> Colour vocab CONTRIBUTIONS 2 |ja, zh, ko, tr, uz, tk, os, ar, fa, ps|

> Colour vocab CONTRIBUTIONS 3 |ca, hr, sr, hy, no, da, sv|

(via whosaprettypolyglot)

9AM

schadenfreudead said: Une question pour vous! car j'suis americain j'ai pas encore metrise la langue *j'ai pas d'accent sur mon clavier excusez-moi* mais pq est-ce qu'on dit "t'inquietes" et "soucis" au lieu de "ne t'inquietes pas" ou "sans soucis" pcq sinon cela veulent dire de s'inquieter et qu'on a de soucis!

french-problems:

"T’inquiète" is short for "Ne t’inquiète pas" ( people also use “t’inquiète pas” ) - It’s very coloquial but vastly used. If you wanna tell someone they should worry / be worried, you’d say “Inquiète-toi”

I’ve never heard / seen anyone say “souci” for “sans souci”. People will use “sans souci” or “pas de problème”.

French 

September272014

(Source: fanduhmbs, via french-problems)

humor 

10AM

4754754746342323992 said: In italian do you use "google" as a verb? (like how in english we say "im googling how to make a cake" or whatever). If so is it like googlare/ io googlo/ tu googla, etc?

lingasms:

Heya! I can’t recall an instance in which I have heard it, but I know I have myself used it a few times, mostly because I find myself translating literally from English sometimes *sigh* - The preferred form seems to be “cercare su google”.

However, I have encountered it quite a few times when chatting on the computer; but only ever in the infinitive/present indicative/present continuous, and always pure-verb forms. I’ve never seen it as past participle for example “I’ho googlato” or with attached pronouns “googlalo” - I guess it just sounds a bit awkward when you simply conjugate it the Italian way and try and pronounce it.

That is my personal experience, though, there might be speakers who have integrated it completely in their speech! Hope that answers your question :)

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