August202014
“Learn a new language and get a new soul.” Czech Proverb (via victoriousvocabulary)

(via lookatmylanguages)

10AM

The Tense Continuum

interretialia:

o-eheu:

LatinTutorial does a great job explaining the tenses in his video A Theory of Tenses. Without undermining his work, I’d like to propose a different way of thinking about tenses, the way I use. If you’re getting confused, turn back immediately. I may be a terrible explainer.

Let’s first imagine a continuum. We’ll consider the left direction retrospective (looking back to the past) and the right direction prospective (looking toward the future). We also have three time periods: past, present, and future.

image

The present tense is the simplest to understand. The event being described is happening at the same time as the conversation. “He is jumping.” We’ll represent the perspective of the conversation as a person, and we’ll represent the event being described as the red marker.

image

When the described event happened in the past, we use the perfect tense (“Taylor cooked a meal,” or “Jack has climbed.”)…

image

…unless the event happened over a period of time, i.e. it was continual. Then we use the imperfect tense (“Taylor was cooking a meal.”). We also use the imperfect tense to express concepts like “used to…” (“We used to visit Rome often.”)

image

If the described event will happen after the conversation, we’re looking prospectively. We would use the future tense (“Ian will give Ben a cookie.”).

image

So far, the continuum admittedly hasn’t been too helpful. I really only keep it in mind for the two final tenses—pluperfect and future perfect. These are the tenses in which our perspective (yes, the little guy just standing there) changes. Our perspective changes due to context.

Imagine you’re telling a story about the time you went to the store. You start off with “I went to the store.” The “went” immediately establishes that this story takes place in the past, so our perspective is in the past. When you then say “The store had already run out of fruit,” you’re describing an event that had already happened before your designated past (or, to hopefully avoid confusion, the described event is more retrospective than your designated past). This is the pluperfect tense, happening before your past.

image

Finally, we reach the future perfect tense. We use the future perfect tense when context has been established that puts our perspective in the future. The future perfect expresses an action that happens before the designated future, or is more retrospective than our designated future. An example from the UK’s National Archives is the sentence “I won’t get home until 8pm now, by which time the film will have happened.” The first bit, the “I won’t get home until 8pm now…”, establishes our perspective. We are talking about the time when the speaker comes home, 8pm. The second bit, “by which time the film will have happened,” is our future perfect event. Relative to our perspective, 8pm, the film is over.

image

Hopefully this helps someone. It works for me. Also, if you have any commentary or ideas of ways I can improve upon this idea, please share! Gratias!

-Beniaminus

Optime!

(“Ian will give Ben a cookie.”)

I would if I could!

9AM
August192014

quintanear:

So I decided to read a sociolinguistics textbook.
These were my reactions to the mention of Portuguese and then to the lack of proofreading. COME ON MAAAAN. COME ON RONALD, BRO!!! WE AIN’T USING NONE O THAT Ñ THING!!!! WE USE NH, BUD!!! GET.IT.TO.GE.THER!!!!

(via jaimetalangue)

11AM
ailmadrid:

Do you know how to express the weather conditions in Spanish? Here’s a nice way to learn it :)
Here in Madrid it’s pretty sunny :)
Aquí en Madrid hace mucho sol :)

ailmadrid:

Do you know how to express the weather conditions in Spanish? Here’s a nice way to learn it :)

Here in Madrid it’s pretty sunny :)

Aquí en Madrid hace mucho sol :)

(via wouldbepolyglot)

11AM

jespru:

I think one of the most significant moments you can have as a language learner is when you know the meaning of a word, but you can’t explain it in your native language. Because, as frustrating as it may be, it does confirm that that particular language is carving out its own autonomous little nook of your brain.

(via speutschlish)

10AM

kvirapasero:

looool.

(Source: finofilipino, via amateurlanguager)

August182014
vanduo-bones:

officialkia:

pennameverity:

This is Duolingo, a language-learning website/app that deserves some serious recognition. It offers over 10 languages for English speakers, as well as courses for non-English speakers around the world, and they’re in the process of adding more. 
But wait, I don’t want to do any more schoolwork! Not to worry little one, Duolingo is actually more like a game. You can compete with friends, and earn “lingots” (which are basically Duolingo money) to buy power-ups, extra activities, and bonus skills - like Flirting.

I’m already taking a language, what do I need this for? 
It’s not really a secret that most school language courses (in America, anyway) suck and only teach you to speak the language at about a third grader’s level. Which is why Duolingo is so freaking awesome.
Teachers can’t give every student individualized attention, but Duolingo can. If you’re not learning the way you want to or as much as you want to in the classroom, Duolingo is a really great resource. It’s easy, tailored to you, and really effective.

Duolingo tracks your progress and reminds you when you haven’t studied for a while or need a refresher on something. Already semi-fluent in a language? No problem, just take a shortcut to more advanced subjects or test out of the lesson. 
The lessons start with the basics (he, she, hello, thank you, etc) and move up to harder stuff. Duolingo focuses on vocabulary first, so you can learn the language and then the grammar that goes with it - much simpler than the system most schools use. It also tracks the number of words you’ve learned and how well you know them.

And you don’t even have to write out the flashcards!
Duolingo is perfect for reviewing everything you forgot over the summer or giving you the extra help you need. And if you’re trying to learn a language on your own, it’s fantastic - you don’t have to create your own lessons. Whether you’re trying to learn your second, third, or fifth language, I seriously recommend Duolingo.
Okay, what else?
Duolingo also has discussion boards, where you can ask for help with a hard lesson, make new friends, watch for updates, and share your achievements.
Even better is the Immersion feature. It won’t send you to Spain or France, but it’s pretty awesome. Duolingo takes real articles from the internet, which users translate. You can translate articles from your native language into the language you’re learning or vice versa, which gives you more experience and makes the Internet more universal.
You can suggest new languages and track Duolingo’s progress in creating new courses. Bilinguals (older than 13) can help to create these courses. Duolingo has a long list of courses that can be contributed to, like Punjabi, Hebrew, and Vietnamese. Oh, and Dothraki, Klingon, Sindarin, and Esperanto.
And the best part? IT’S COMPLETELY FREE. 
If you love languages or just want to pass French class this year, USE DUOLINGO. Download the app and practice a language while you wait for the bus instead of playing Angry Birds!

Coolest app I’ve ever downloaded.


honestly, i used this app to practice italian for class and it helped me SO MUCH. considering that you have to constantly practice grammar and give feedback rather than staring at a teacher for hours on end. 

I have used Duolingo for over a year now and I have to say it is a pretty great resource, especially considering that it is free.Admittedly I kind of resent the statement that school isn’t helpful for learning foreign languages in the US because I have learned a lot more from school than Duolingo and other internet resources. For me, Duo helps reinforce the stuff I learn in school. Like it helped me review Italian last year when I finished taking all the courses my school had to offer. I tried starting German from scratch on Duo and it was really hard, though. I consider it a great supplement to language learning methods.

vanduo-bones:

officialkia:

pennameverity:

This is Duolingo, a language-learning website/app that deserves some serious recognition. It offers over 10 languages for English speakers, as well as courses for non-English speakers around the world, and they’re in the process of adding more. 

But wait, I don’t want to do any more schoolwork! Not to worry little one, Duolingo is actually more like a game. You can compete with friends, and earn “lingots” (which are basically Duolingo money) to buy power-ups, extra activities, and bonus skills - like Flirting.

image

I’m already taking a language, what do I need this for? 

It’s not really a secret that most school language courses (in America, anyway) suck and only teach you to speak the language at about a third grader’s level. Which is why Duolingo is so freaking awesome.

Teachers can’t give every student individualized attention, but Duolingo can. If you’re not learning the way you want to or as much as you want to in the classroom, Duolingo is a really great resource. It’s easy, tailored to you, and really effective.

image

Duolingo tracks your progress and reminds you when you haven’t studied for a while or need a refresher on something. Already semi-fluent in a language? No problem, just take a shortcut to more advanced subjects or test out of the lesson. 

The lessons start with the basics (he, she, hello, thank you, etc) and move up to harder stuff. Duolingo focuses on vocabulary first, so you can learn the language and then the grammar that goes with it - much simpler than the system most schools use. It also tracks the number of words you’ve learned and how well you know them.

image

And you don’t even have to write out the flashcards!

Duolingo is perfect for reviewing everything you forgot over the summer or giving you the extra help you need. And if you’re trying to learn a language on your own, it’s fantastic - you don’t have to create your own lessons. Whether you’re trying to learn your second, third, or fifth language, I seriously recommend Duolingo.

Okay, what else?

Duolingo also has discussion boards, where you can ask for help with a hard lesson, make new friends, watch for updates, and share your achievements.

Even better is the Immersion feature. It won’t send you to Spain or France, but it’s pretty awesome. Duolingo takes real articles from the internet, which users translate. You can translate articles from your native language into the language you’re learning or vice versa, which gives you more experience and makes the Internet more universal.

You can suggest new languages and track Duolingo’s progress in creating new courses. Bilinguals (older than 13) can help to create these courses. Duolingo has a long list of courses that can be contributed to, like Punjabi, Hebrew, and Vietnamese. Oh, and Dothraki, Klingon, Sindarin, and Esperanto.

And the best part? IT’S COMPLETELY FREE. 

If you love languages or just want to pass French class this year, USE DUOLINGO. Download the app and practice a language while you wait for the bus instead of playing Angry Birds!

Coolest app I’ve ever downloaded.

honestly, i used this app to practice italian for class and it helped me SO MUCH. considering that you have to constantly practice grammar and give feedback rather than staring at a teacher for hours on end.

I have used Duolingo for over a year now and I have to say it is a pretty great resource, especially considering that it is free.

Admittedly I kind of resent the statement that school isn’t helpful for learning foreign languages in the US because I have learned a lot more from school than Duolingo and other internet resources. For me, Duo helps reinforce the stuff I learn in school. Like it helped me review Italian last year when I finished taking all the courses my school had to offer. I tried starting German from scratch on Duo and it was really hard, though. I consider it a great supplement to language learning methods.

(via spanishmajorproblems)

August132014

Duolingo released Italian for French speakers in the incubator today! I have been waiting for so long for this course to start being created :D

August122014

When I get stressed out on days like these with stuff like #collegefinances #collegejob #collegelife #collegegrades before #college has even started for the year it makes me really miss Italy

Because I was so worry-free and relaxed there and sometimes I just want to cry because I want to go back so bad but I can’t

And today I found out that although I don’t have to pay back the loan I took out to go to Italy until I graduate, I have to pay interest on it every quarter while I’m a student

I mean the trip was worth every penny but )&;”?@(: WHY DOES COLLEGE AND STUDY ABROAD HAVE TO BE SO EXPENSIVE ;&(@:&(&?

I just want to travel and learn languages and go to school without all the stress and stop worrying all the time.

And I wish that wasn’t too much to ask for.

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